Goldman and Luby awarded Baldwin Grant

The subjects of the eight projects selected for grants from the Ira and Ineva Reilly Baldwin Wisconsin Idea Endowment are varied but all will help the university contribute knowledge and resources across the state.

Ira Baldwin, a longtime UW teacher, researcher and administrator, served as dean of the Graduate School and the College of Agriculture and as vice president for academic affairs. Ineva Reilly Baldwin taught and served in the university administration as assistant dean of women and associate dean of the College of Letters & Science. Their endowment is one of the largest gifts ever received by UW–Madison.

Preserving and Advancing Seed Sovereignty and Crop Genetic Diversity for Native American Tribes in Wisconsin

Irwin Goldman, professor and chair, Department of Horticulture, and Claire Luby, research associate, Department of Horticulture

Maintaining and increasing genetic diversity in crop varieties can benefit from knowledge of population genetics. In addition, controlled pollination techniques can provide greater efficiency for managing cross-pollinated heritage seed varieties. Today, there is significant interest among tribal members in assessing, maintaining and utilizing these valuable genetic resources for both food and seed sovereignty, as well as public health and nutrition. Despite the existence of a number of new training resources for those who wish to preserve and maintain seed of heritage crop varieties, we have identified the need for creating culturally appropriate resources that will mesh with the traditions and relationships around food and land resources in native communities for this two-year project.

Originally posted here: https://news.wisc.edu/eight-projects-win-baldwin-grants/

New Summer Course – Hort 375.001 – Discovering the World of Wines and Vines

Hort 375. 001 Summer Course Flyer

Dr. Amaya Atucha and Dr. Claudia Calderon will be teaching a new course this summer called “Hort 375-001: Discovering the World of Wines and Vines”. It will be offered during the 8-week summer session on Mondays and Wednesdays, 5-7:30 PM, and will cover a range of topics from grape production, to wine making and wine appreciation.

Course Description

This course is an introduction to grape production and wine culture targeting students and general public interested in learning about growing grapes, winemaking, and wine appreciation. Course topics include cultural history and geography of the world’s grape-producing regions, principles of grape and wine production, wine producing regions of the world and wine styles, and sensory evaluation of wines. There are no prerequisite for this class, as it is an introductory course. Each class will be divided into a regular lecture (60 minutes) where instructors and guest lecturers will cover the topics listed below, and a 60 minutes wine tasting session that will provide sensory experience to the topics covered in lecture.

Learning Goals

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Outline basic chemistry and biology to viticulture and winemaking
• Explain general concepts of grape production and winemaking process
• Discuss the history of wine around the world and its relation to culture
• Implement tasting strategies to characterize wine from different regions of the world.

Please direct any enrollment questions to Kathryn Jones at kjones26@wisc.edu. University Special Students (non-degree seeking) information can be found here: https://acsss.wisc.edu/enrollment/

Gift Establishes Endowed Fellowship in Vegetable Crops

The Department of Horticulture is extremely grateful for the generous donation from Steve and Christa Slinger of Randolph, Wisconsin to establish an endowed graduate fellowship in vegetable crops in the Department of Horticulture.  Steve and Christa have had a long association with UW-Madison and with the Department of Horticulture, and have committed a gift of $200,000 to establish this endowed fellowship.

Their gift will receive a “Nicholas Match,” which will double its value to $400,000. In 2015, the Nicholas family pledged to match new gifts toward fellowships at UW-Madison. The Slinger fellowship is to be used at the discretion of the department to support graduate students working with horticulture faculty on research involving vegetable crops.

Steve and Christa have had successful careers as vegetable farmers and continue their efforts to produce high quality crops in the Randolph area. Our department expresses its gratitude to them for this generous gift.