Farm to Flavor Dinner Scheduled

Join the Seed to Kitchen Collaborative and Allen Centennial Garden for Farm to Flavor 2017, a signature dinner experience and celebration of Wisconsin food that will be held on Thursday, Aug. 24 from 5 – 9 p.m. in the Discovery Building.

This unconventional tasting event will celebrate biodiversity in food through small plate dishes from Madison’s talented chefs. Taste habaneros bred for almost undetectable spice, tomatoes with a dark indigo pigment or beets bred to be deliciously mild and sweet. Learn from keynote speaker Lane Selman about the important role plant breeders play in building a more just and resilient food system, and the ways local chefs, farmers and eaters are working together to further the cause. Sample vegetables straight from the plant on a tour of Allen Centennial Garden immediately preceding the dinner.

The eight chefs of the Seed to Kitchen Collaborative evaluate hundreds of vegetable varieties every season, providing valuable feedback to plant breeders around the country. Farm to Flavor is their chance to share what they’ve learned with you, by featuring each of their favorite varieties in a dish of their own design.

Participating chefs include:

  • Jonny Hunter, Underground Food Collective
  • Torry Miller, L’Etoile, Graze, Sujeo, Estrellon
  • Dan Bonnano, Pig in a Fur Coat
  • Eric Benedit, Cafe Hollander
  • Joe Cloute, Heritage Catering
  • Yusuf Bin-Rella, Dejope Dining
  • Kathy Griswold, Epic
  • Sean Fogarty, Steenbock’s on Orchard

Keynote speaker Lane Selman is the founding director of the Culinary Breeding Network in Portland, Ore., which brings together plant breeders, chefs, bakers and other stakeholders in the food community to create more relevant and desirable cultivars for organic farmers. Lane has earned national acclaim for her work furthering the concept of “culinary breeding” and is a tireless advocate for small-scale organic producers.

To learn more and purchase tickets, visit the Isthmus Tickets page.

Farm to Flavor 2017 dinner attendees may also be interested in attending the UW Organic Vegetable Variety Trials Field Day that will take place earlier that day.

Medicinal Plant Symposium September 30

The Department of Horticulture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is holding a unique Medicinal Plant Symposium on Friday, September 30, 2016 from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

This is a free event and is available to the general public. The symposium will feature an evening filled with a community of professionals, students and the general public for a series of talks about medicinal plants.

The event will include talks by community professionals from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Ebling Auditorium in the Microbial Sciences building on UW campus, followed by a reception at Allen Centennial Garden from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., where attendees can explore the live collections of medicinal plants, mingle and enjoy refreshments.

There will be six speakers including fellow UW-Madison faulty from the Department of Family Medicine, Bruce Barrett and David Kiefer. Other speakers include, Edith Leoso of the Bad River Tribal Historic Preservation Office, Jeff Grignon from Menominee Tribal Enterprises, Yangbum Gyal from the Medicine Buddha Healing Center and Tibetan Medicine & Acupuncture and Chris Tyrrell from the Milwaukee Public Museum.

The talks will cover a range of topics including, a historical overview of the use of herbal medicines; traditional knowledge of plant healing; the intricate relationships of humans and plants in Wisconsin Native American communities; a Tibetan perspective on medicinal plants; using Echinacea to treat the common cold; and the importance of ethnobotanical collections.

To register for this event visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/medicinal-plant-symposium-tickets-26810552083. For more information, contact Claudia Calderón at cicalderon@wisc.edu or (608) 416-9335.

Originally posted in eCALS by Kaitlin McIntosh, Allen Centennial Garden student Intern

Sustainable Landscapes Collaborative

A collaborative effort on the UW-Madison campus focussing on Sustainable Landscapes in the Built Environment (SLBE), is bringing together expertise from across  campus to examine questions and opportunities in sustainable landscape design, implementation, maintenance, and impact.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is uniquely positioned to contribute to the rapidly developing area of sustainable landscapes through collaborations across a broad range of disciplines, programs, schools, and colleges. A group of faculty and staff from the Nelson Institute, Graduate School, and College of Agricultural and Life Sciences have identified an emerging interest in the theme of sustainable landscapes across many disciplines at UW-Madison. Scholarship, design, and practical programming in many aspects of sustainable landscapes is already in progress,including projects that connect public health, sustainable cities, urban planning, landscape and garden design, water and nutrient management, and many other disciplines.

For additional information and resources from a recently held workshop, link to SLBE.