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Graduate Program- Overview

Graduate study in the Department of Horticulture requires a combination of research, advanced coursework, and participation in seminars. Our students, faculty, and staff perform research on a variety of topics within the discipline including vegetable crop breeding and production, fruit crop breeding and production, physiology, evolution, biochemistry, bioinformatics, applied weed management, ornamentals, and basic plant development. Interdisciplinary work is highly encouraged and frequent seminars by distinguished scientists help keep students and faculty in touch with recent discoveries in the plant sciences. For more information about graduate research opportunities, please contact Graduate Coordinator at hort@hort.wisc.edu

The Department of Horticulture has an active graduate program with three distinct degree tracks:

The MS degree may serve as a terminal degree or it may be recommended as an interim degree for students working toward the PhD. The PhD is a research degree, which is granted on evidence of ability for independent investigation leading to original research in Horticulture. Normally, an MS degree requires two-to-three years to complete; a PhD generally takes five-to-six years of graduate work to complete the requirements.

Why Choose UW-Madison for Graduate Study?

Exceptional Academics

The tremendous breadth of academic programs at UW-Madison offers students a wide selection of supporting course work and interdisciplinary opportunities. 157 majors offer master’s degrees and 110 majors offer doctorate degrees. More than 30,000 doctorates have been awarded by UW-Madison!

Excellence in Research

UW-Madison ranks as one of the most prolific research universities in the world, placing second among American public universities for research expenditures.

Incredible Campus and Community

The campus rolls along Lake Mendota, with wooded hills and the busy city streets of downtown Madison. Madison is small enough to navigate easily, but with cultural resources and amenities that rival those of cities many times its size.