Atucha Receives Alfred Toepfer Faculty Fellow Award

Atucha’s research focuses on fruit crop physiology and production of deciduous fruit crops (cranberry, apple and grapes in particular). Her current research areas include cold hardiness of fruit crops, improving fruit quality of cold hardy wine grapes through cultural practices and differences in root growth rates of rootstocks as affected by soil borne pathogens. She is also a UW-Extension fruit crop specialist.

The one-year award is bestowed on pre-tenure faculty whose research benefits agricultural activities within the United States and whose areas of interest lie in the scientific fields of crop research, improvements in crop yield and quality, or animal sciences. The award can also go to faculty members whose agricultural research is considered biological or physical in nature.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Congratulations Jim Nienhuis!

Jim Nienhuis, professor in the department, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Award from the Bean Improvement Cooperative.  The Meritorious Service Award has been presented to over 50 individuals during the 56-year history of the BIC. The recipients have devoted many years to bean research adn education and have consistently provided outstanding service to the organization.

Jim will receive the award on October 28, 2013, in Portland, Oregon at the BIC biennial meeting.

Congratulations Jim Nienhuis!

Jim Nienhuis, professor in the department, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Award from the Bean Improvement Cooperative.  The Meritorious Service Award has been presented to over 50 individuals during the 56-year history of the BIC. The recipients have devoted many years to bean research adn education and have consistently provided outstanding service to the organization.

Jim will receive the award on October 28, 2013, in Portland, Oregon at the BIC biennial meeting.

Congratulations, Juan Zalapa!

Juan Zalapa has been selected to receive the Council for Opportunity in Education‘s 2013 National TRIO Achievers award. Zalapa is an assistant professor in the Department of Horticulture and a USDA-ARS Research Geneticist.

The Federal TRIO Programs (TRIO) are Federal outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. TRIO includes the Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair Scholars program) whose mission is to prepare eligible low-income and first-generation college students and students from groups that are underrepresented in graduate education for doctoral studies through research and other scholarly activities.

The goal of the McNair program is to increase the attainment of Ph.D. degrees by students underrepresented in graduate education. Dr. Zalapa participated in the TRIO McNair Scholars program as an undergraduate student.

Zalapa received his Ph.D. in Plant Breeding & Plant Genetics in 2005 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Zalapa is actively engaged in the university community, striving to make it a space that is inclusive for underrepresented minorities in STEM majors. He attends McNair seminars and shares his personal journey as a McNair Scholar on the path to PhD and the professoriate.

The TRIO Awards will be presented at the Annual Educational Opportunity dinner September 10, 2013 in Chicago.

Congratulations, Juan Zalapa!

Juan Zalapa has been selected to receive the Council for Opportunity in Education‘s 2013 National TRIO Achievers award. Zalapa is an assistant professor in the Department of Horticulture and a USDA-ARS Research Geneticist.

The Federal TRIO Programs (TRIO) are Federal outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. TRIO includes the Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair Scholars program) whose mission is to prepare eligible low-income and first-generation college students and students from groups that are underrepresented in graduate education for doctoral studies through research and other scholarly activities.

The goal of the McNair program is to increase the attainment of Ph.D. degrees by students underrepresented in graduate education. Dr. Zalapa participated in the TRIO McNair Scholars program as an undergraduate student.

Zalapa received his Ph.D. in Plant Breeding & Plant Genetics in 2005 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Zalapa is actively engaged in the university community, striving to make it a space that is inclusive for underrepresented minorities in STEM majors. He attends McNair seminars and shares his personal journey as a McNair Scholar on the path to PhD and the professoriate.

The TRIO Awards will be presented at the Annual Educational Opportunity dinner September 10, 2013 in Chicago.