Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Dawson receives NCR-SARE Grant

MADISON, Wis. — Julie Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension has recently been recommended for funding for a $199,866 grant from the North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) for the project “Tomato variety trials for flavor, quality and agronomic performance, to increase high-value direct marketing opportunities for farmers and on-farm trialing capacity”.

“This project will use participatory research methods to evaluate tomato varieties for agronomic traits, disease resistance, flavor and quality for local and regional markets in the NCR. Variety trials will be conducted on six participating farms and at two research stations. Tomato varieties will be evaluated for flavor and quality by a panel of chefs, farmers and selected consumers. An online database enabling farmers, chefs and researchers to easily exchange observations and data will be developed. This project will create a variety trialing and quality evaluation network that will also be used for other crops,” said Dawson.

Bussan comments through WPR News on Central Sands water use

Link to Listen

A.J. Bussan, a potato and vegetable specialist with University of Wisconsin Extension, says central Wisconsin farmers are doing a better job at growing profitable crops while at the same time making less of a demand on local water supplies.

The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism reports this week that high-capacity wells are why some lakes in the Central Sands region have gone down anywhere from two to four feet. A lot of that water is used to irrigate crops.

Bussan says farmers are planting less thirsty crops than the traditional field corn and Russet-Burbank potatoes that used to dominate the region.

“There’s more snap bean acres that are being planted under irrigation, and there’s more sweet corn that’s being grown under irrigation,” says Bussan. “Snap beans typically used about one-third to one-half of the water that potato crops use, and sweet corn usually uses about half.”

Bussan says the extension has been working closely with Central Sands farmers on water conservation for the last four or five years.

 

Bussan comments through WPR News on Central Sands water use

Link to Listen

A.J. Bussan, a potato and vegetable specialist with University of Wisconsin Extension, says central Wisconsin farmers are doing a better job at growing profitable crops while at the same time making less of a demand on local water supplies.

The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism reports this week that high-capacity wells are why some lakes in the Central Sands region have gone down anywhere from two to four feet. A lot of that water is used to irrigate crops.

Bussan says farmers are planting less thirsty crops than the traditional field corn and Russet-Burbank potatoes that used to dominate the region.

“There’s more snap bean acres that are being planted under irrigation, and there’s more sweet corn that’s being grown under irrigation,” says Bussan. “Snap beans typically used about one-third to one-half of the water that potato crops use, and sweet corn usually uses about half.”

Bussan says the extension has been working closely with Central Sands farmers on water conservation for the last four or five years.

 

Bussan comments through WPR News on Central Sands water use

Link to Listen

A.J. Bussan, a potato and vegetable specialist with University of Wisconsin Extension, says central Wisconsin farmers are doing a better job at growing profitable crops while at the same time making less of a demand on local water supplies.

The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism reports this week that high-capacity wells are why some lakes in the Central Sands region have gone down anywhere from two to four feet. A lot of that water is used to irrigate crops.

Bussan says farmers are planting less thirsty crops than the traditional field corn and Russet-Burbank potatoes that used to dominate the region.

“There’s more snap bean acres that are being planted under irrigation, and there’s more sweet corn that’s being grown under irrigation,” says Bussan. “Snap beans typically used about one-third to one-half of the water that potato crops use, and sweet corn usually uses about half.”

Bussan says the extension has been working closely with Central Sands farmers on water conservation for the last four or five years.